The issues we had with our stay at Santhiya began almost immediately after we landed at Koh Samui airport. Sigh.

Upon landing at the airport and after clearing customs and collecting our luggage, we headed to the Arrivals pick-up point and waited there stupidly for 45 minutes, before a friendly local who was also waiting for his pick-up gestured that we were supposed to go to the other pick-up point – which I assumed was the Departures drop-off – for our ride to the Koh Samui pier. Yep you’ve guessed it. We had no idea there was this other pick-up point that while was just a few minutes away, was not within eye-shot. We were thus late for our pick-up for our scheduled speedboat transfer to the resort’s pier. Not that our late arrival mattered, since the choppy waters meant that the speedboat could not directly transfer us to the resort’s pier, but instead brought us to the back-up location – Baan Tai pier, which was on the opposite end of the island. The boat ride in choppy waters was terrifying for Hannah and Peter, but there was more to come. Between the pier and the resort were winding roads up and down hills, and a very bumpy stretch of muddy road where our 4×4 vehicle had to inch forwards trying to navigate the path.

At the start of the boat ride to Baan Tai pier Within minutes, both kids are gonna look terrified instead.

At the start of the boat ride to Baan Tai pier Within minutes, both kids are gonna look terrified instead.

Thing is; I’d read a lot about the transportation options getting to the resort, and opted specifically for the direct speedboat transfer from Koh Samui to the resort as I wasn’t sure how the kids would handle bumpy rides. I also checked my correspondence with the resort to see if they said anything about the other pick-up point. Nothing on that end either. When I pointed this out to the Guest Relations Officer at the Resort, all I got was an apologetic reply that the choppy waters meant that the speedboat could not bring us to the Resort’s pier, but there was no offer of a refund or even partial discount off the premium we paid for it.

The unit as I described previously is indeed lovely and well-decorated, but it’s not without its sets of issues. For starters, the teak wood floor base did not seem to absorb vibrations well. In fact they seemed somewhat hollow beneath. While I didn’t for a moment think that the structure was going to collapse under its weight anytime soon, it did mean that we had to tiptoe everywhere we were in the unit, less our foorsteps gave the rest of our family nausea. The problem was less pronounced in the common areas like the main restaurant, presumably because it was less elevated than the villa units, but we had to frequently confine Hannah to her bed when Peter was trying to nap, lest her foot steps around the villa wake him up.

Oddly too, we faced power disruptions several times a day – especially at night. It wasn’t a big thing, since the disruption came back on simultaneously each time, but I observed that their WIFI router reset each time too in these power outages, which meant an inconvenient re-login reconnection back to the router

And talking about Internet access, believe or not – Internet access was better in the toilet end of our villa than the main living/bedroom areas. In fact, WIFI was so spotty in the latter areas that it was practically unusable for a good part of our stay. The Internet access in the main restaurant and concierge areas were much better though, so you’ll want to head there if you have serious work to do.

And the mosquitoes – ugh. We live in the tropics and know more than a thing about mosquitoes. But the situation in the Resort can get pretty bad. One evening while waiting for dinner, we hung out at the concierge lobby – and Ling with her eagle-eyes, smacked a total of five critters in the space of 15 minutes. And Hannah got one even. The mosquitoes for the most part didn’t get into our villa, but on the occasion when a couple did one evening, gave all of us bites (excepting Peter who slept in a mosquito net).

Eagle-eyed wife said this was the Aedes mosquito, capable of carrying Dengue fever. Thankfully, there was no such outbreak in this part of the world - unlike Singapore for several months this year.

Mosquito population -1, thanks to Ling. The eagle-eyed wife said this was the Aedes mosquito, capable of carrying Dengue fever. Thankfully, there was no such outbreak in this part of the world – unlike Singapore for several months this year.

Most seriously though was the overall pricing of dining in the Resort. Granted that this is an island, and I guess most fresh produce has to be brought in, but it was hard to believe the dine-in prices at the Resort’s restaurants when a nearby village with numerous street-side restaurants were whipping up local cuisine at a fraction of the price. Stir-fried mixed vegetables for instance cost 330 THB in the Resort, and 70 THB in the village’s restaurants. I don’t think higher prices for better service standards at least, hygiene probably and culinary quality are unusual, but the price difference was almost 5 times in this case. That’s just too much differential in my opinion. Peter didn’t get spared too, picking up a touch of diarrhea at the last few days.

On the third evening, we had the international buffet at 799 THB an adult – and I had food poisoning. Yep, me – a Singaporean who’s used to stomach abuse with all the wildly different food available here at the International crossroads – vomited and stayed sick for the next 2 days, making miserable a good part of my stay. Oh, maybe it had nothing to do with the buffet, but the nausea and vomiting started 30 minutes after we finished. Too close to not draw a relation.

Topping it off; our vacation was at a period when the weather was mostly gloomy. That caught us by surprise, as we’d thought this part of the world wouldn’t be experiencing monsoon. Not at all the fault of the resort of course.

All-in; would I recommend Santhiya? Yes on account of the generally good condition villas and exclusiveness of the Resort – but with caveats. Specifically: be aware of the transportation options and risks, live with the mosquitoes, be prepared to take the 10 minute brisk walk to the nearby village for meals, and bring diarrhea medication – just in case!

Next couple of posts to come on the various other parts of our stay, and additional notes on our stay @ Santhiya.

 

Well – six of seven days later into our 2014 vacation at the Santhiya @ koh Phangan, I’ve got decidedly mixed feelings about the place! Some parts of it were indeed as advertised, while others weren’t – and to top it off, we had a few unexpected mishaps.

Some brief facts about our stay first: we stayed at the Hideaway Pool Villa for a seven day stay, opting for also the private speedboat transfer. Total damage was about TBH58K, or about SGD2,351. Not exactly cheap for resort-centered stays, more so that this resort isn’t situated in an overpriced everywhere Singapore.

Firstly; the good things.

The villa sits on a pretty secluded north-easterly spot on the island, and has its own private beach that’s marked out by inaccessible rocks on one end, and by more rocks on the other end. Not easily accessible from the rest of the island too (more on that later). The villa we stayed in was also reasonably private. While the villas themselves are not spaced that far apart, foliage and trees are cleverly used to isolate one unit from the next. Our villa also sat near the top of one steep incline, which meant that we could occasionally hear vehicles that were trying to get up-hill. Not loud enough to be of a bother at all, but it’s there if you’re the type to notice these things.

Our Hideaway Pool Villa Suite. It's as lovely as it looks from the picture here

Our Hideaway Pool Villa Suite. It’s as lovely as it looks from the picture here

The resort spans a very large 18 acres spot, and uses the space to maximum advantage with beautifully landscaped features all around. The beach, main restaurant and main pool sit on the lower end of the resort, while the other restaurant and pool are situated at the upper end. The villas and units are served by buggies which serve guests round the clock for those who don’t want to manage the climb. The resort is also reasonably new, opening its doors in July 2006. There are 60 villas in the Resort, and two other accommodation buildings housing maybe another dozen or so units. All in, it’s a fairly large resort with very few units.

Our villa, like the others in the resort, had golden teak wood with intricately carved wood as a central theme. We like the general architecture of the unit, though our specific unit configuration wasn’t what we’d initially expected. Specifically, some of the villa units feature outdoor shower areas. I did inquire during our back/forth correspondence about outdoor bugs that might invade the shower areas (wouldn’t want Hannah freaking out in the middle of the night!), but the resort assumed I was requesting the units with the indoor shower type, and allocated one such. That did mean that we had somewhat less common space after the children’s bedding was put in, but hindsight, it worked as well – since the cloudy weather and occasional rain brought out a host of insect inhabitants to run around in the outdoor areas!

Three beds in the main bedroom.

Three beds in the main bedroom.

Our villa’s pool – one of our eagerly anticipated highlight – didn’t disappoint. It was as large as it looked from the pictures, reasonably well-maintained, and also deep enough at the deepest end for swimming. Make no mistake though; you won’t be swimming length-wise laps in this pool, but it’s somewhat wide enough for you to swim circles around it at least. The kids certainly loved the pool. We spent several afternoons lazing on our pool’s deck chairs; with Peter napping in his cot, Hannah scampering around anything that caught her current attention, and Ling reading a borrowed library book about life in North Korea (duh – yep!).

The resort never felt crowded, and the over the week we were there, guests were mostly Caucasians (especially Germans), and we encountered just one other local Singaporean family. Yep; no other Asians, and certainly and thankfully no misbehaving or rowdy North-Asian tourists!

The staff were as a rule, friendly and hospitable – well, at least apart from one buggy driver who did not smile, did not greet, and instead gave us a cold hard look whenever we boarded his vehicle to/fro the common areas and our villa. Other than that, we found the staff accommodating and attentive, and possibly even over-staffed during meal times that we never needed to call long for attention. Oddly though while the staff were hospitable, we observed that they didn’t as a rule make attempts at polite conversation to most guests. The smiles were genuine, but unlike some of the other five-star establishments we’ve stayed, the staff didn’t attempt to engage most guests beyond greetings. Housekeeping was brisk and spot-on too for the most part, excepting one evening late in our stay when they missed their housekeeping service. We observed a team of four (two chambermaids and two pool boys to scoop leaves out of the pool, and clean the general surroundings), and we had four bottles of water brought to our villa twice.

Hannah especially liked the croissants at breakfast, and had at least two every morning.

Hannah especially liked the croissants at breakfast, and had at least two every morning.

Breakfast was a mix of Asian and Western cuisine types. The fare was generally savory, though by the time we got to the midpoint of our stay, we were getting a little tired of more/less same spread each morning! The restaurant and adjourning areas was large enough to host a sizable number of guests, so we never felt like we were rushing for seats, nor did we feel compelled to finish up and go to make space for others (not that we ever chose to overstay our welcome). There was in-restaurant live local music each day too, which added more local flavor to the ambiance.

More in the next post – the not-so-good.

And for my 43rd BD, the wife got me this:

LG G Watch R - what a mouthful LOL.

LG G Watch R – what a mouthful LOL.

And I like it.:) Ling every year has a lot of difficulties thinking of the right gadget/toy to buy for me. There were two memorable BD presents mishaps of this type, including an expensive electronic shaver that shredded my chin and turned it into a bloody mess, and an Android Transformer tablet that was gimped because it was a Wifi-only model. But she really did a lot of homework before deciding on this year’s: and the present was perfect! I never had an interest in the early Android-based smartwatches, e.g. those in the Samsung Gear S series, as they were invariably clunky, not of the right form-factor, and/or offered poor battery life.

The LG G Watch R is LG’s most recent attempt at an Android smartwatch, and in my evaluation, they have got it more right than its competitors. For instance:

Round and flat form. The Samsung Gear watches were rectangle-ish, and while stylish as dress-watches, just weren’t the right shape for me.

Better battery life than many of its current competitors, and probably on account of its OLED technology that makes for not just a nicely saturated display, but also more power-saving.

As Ling accounts it though, this watch was extremely difficult to find and even buy here in Singapore. Very few shops carried it, and the couple of ones that did were located in inconvenient locations, especially considering that she had to buy the watch in relative secrecy and with two kids in tow.

Now, if only the watch was a little more water-resistant, it’d be a full replacement for a crusty old Casio swimmer-capable watch that I normally wear. As it is, this new LG watch will probably have to stay at home in our upcoming Koh Phangan vacation later this weekend.

 

Ever since picking up the iPad mini Retina in June this year, my mobile data usage has shot up significantly, and each month at about its fourth week, I start having to put very close attention and ensure that I don’t bust the data limit given in my current mobile phone plan.Case in point: a couple of weeks ago while at Hannah’s K1 concert, I browsed for about an hour or so while waiting for her class’ turn on stage – and within that period, chalked up almost 200MB of data usage. And mind you, these were just browsing through the bunch of hobbyist discussion forums I follow. I guess it’s a sign of how much I’ve been using the 7.9 inch tablet on the go.

That got me started thinking seriously about subscribing to a dedicated mobile broadband plan. I was fairly certain what the upper limit of my usage was. But there aren’t that many providers of such services here in Singapore, and in Singtel and M1’s case, their pricing tiers and bundled mobile data are roughly in the same ballpark. Starhub provides a bit more data along its price tiers, but that increased data limit loses its luster as their package with tablet device deals seemed a little higher than its competitors. Since a new tablet was going to come with the subscription plan I was interested in, the big decision to make was which tablet. My preference was to go with an approximately 8 inch tablet again, but:

Samsung Galaxy S 8.4: regarded as one of the best ~8 inch Android-based tablets currently available. Slim, light, gorgeous screen and a decent processor. The discounts going with the bundled package though weren’t particularly attractive against what you’d pay on retail. And while magazine reviews reported on its long battery life, actual user reports were less sanguine.

Galaxy Nexus 9: which was released at just about this time. Unfortunately, none of the telcos offered this tablet alongside its packages – possibly at least on account that the LTE versions of it weren’t available yet.

iPad mini 3: Apple’s update to the Mini Retina I’ve already got, but from all counts, is a very minor bump with its addition of Touch ID.

iPad Air 2: Slimmer, more powerful version of the iPad Air from last year.

The new iPad mini 3 was dropped from consideration quickly: I really didn’t want another mini that was nearly identical to the one I’ve already got, specs wise. The decision came down to the Galaxy S 8.4 or the iPad Air 2. The latter package offered attractive discounts against what I’d pay on retail, but the price of a package with the 64GB model was still pretty hefty. And as the app stores go, as ardent an Android fan I am, the reality remains that tablet apps generally just run and look better on iPads than Android tablets.

iPad Air 2 Gold Edition

iPad Air 2 Gold Edition

So, the iPad Air 2 it was. And having used it for a week now:

Screen’s good, and the color gamut is quite different from that of the iPad mini Retina, and also the iPad 4.

The iPad Air 2’s processor is reportedly loads faster than the previous iPad generations. In normal use, things do feel just a tad more responsive, but the difference isn’t large enough to startle.

The device is thin. In fact, so thin that you’ll want to protect the tablet quickly with a good case! My first iPad slowly broke down after Ling accidentally stepped on it years ago. This new iPad will probably just break in two if the same happened.

Touch ID took some configuring, but once properly setup, has worked very well. Loads more convenient to unlock the tablet now.

Battery power does indeed seem to expend itself quicker than the mini or iPad 4.

All in, the iPad Air 2 is quicker, smoother, and more pleasing to use. Just a pity on the shorter battery life and also form factor – if only this device came in an 8.4 inch size!

 

Every year-end, Hannah looks forward to her year-end concert where each class of students in her school get onto stage to perform a dance item. The occasion for Hannah’s K1 year occurred a fortnight ago, and our girl was – as before – quite enthusiastic about it in the weeks leading up to her big day. She wanted us to watch her practice and give her critique, and even drew a very helpful map of the dance stage, explaining where she’ll start, where she’ll be at each beat, and the spot she’ll be standing on at the end. Got to say – the map was loads helpful, as a year ago, we spent several seconds hunting for where she was when her class item came, as we were sitting quite far from the stage! We felt that sense of parental pride watching Hannah on stage. Our girl is nothing like her daddy at that age for sure – i.e. no stage fright – and she did her moves with a visible display of confidence, never hesitating, and quite matter-of-fact. Probably all muscle-memory at this point from lots of practice!

The 75-300mm lens did the photographic honors again, and it the focal length at the extreme end was more than adequate for close-up shots of the action. Pity that the maximum aperture was a relatively small f6.7. The speed of the dance moves also meant that a reasonably quick shutter speed was necessary. All in, ISO was driven up to 3200. Sadly too, the pictures this year taken by professional photographers engaged by the school weren’t quite as good as last year’s efforts.

This might be one of those reasons why Ling is glad we've got a daughter; Mommy gets to makeup her girl.

This might be one of those reasons why Ling is glad we’ve got a daughter; Mommy gets to makeup her girl.

Ready to head out of the house to Kallang Theater!

Ready to head out of the house to Kallang Theater!

On stage. One of the few professionally taken pictures that turned out decent.

On stage. One of the few professionally taken pictures that turned out decent.

Family selfie with the 14mm.:)

Family selfie with the 14mm.:)

 

Hannah and Peter’s first Blurb book arrived just before the Deepavali public holiday yesterday. This is the seventh book I’ve worked on, with a two year gap from the sixth book. Funnily, every time I finish one, I tell myself I’ll want to do the next one in a year – largely in view that I take so many pictures of our kids that I need an annual schedule to keep up, or be forced to drop a lot of pictures that should go into their printed photo collections. For the next time round though, I’m gonna have to figure out a way to make sure I do get Book VIII out in a year’s time, hopefully easier since we should have plenty of great pictures to select from our upcoming family vacation at year’s end.

The new Book VII covers the period when we’d just returned from our Telunas Beach Resort trip in 2012, up till early October this year. The new book is also just a shade thinner at 214 pages than the one before, which finished at 220 pages; though there are a lot more pictures in the new one – 346 versus 289, largely made possible because there are a lot more multi-picture page panels, and also by reducing the number of blog posts included in the book’s appendices. The cost of book production has gone out significantly on the other hand. Two copies of Book VI, and printed using all the best print and paper options on offer – ProLine Pearl Photo paper, ProLine Black End Sheets, ProLine Charcoal Linen, hard cover with dust jacket – cost US$218.84 two years ago, and two copies of the slightly thinner Book VII cost US$263.18 now – an hefty 20% increase. Ironically, right after the books arrived, the store ran a 25% discount for printed books. Gaah. If I’d only waited for a fortnight more.

The book as arrived continues to feel very premium. Great photo paper quality, and no printing errors. I didn’t feel as satisfied with the photos inside it this time though. There were odd color casts in a couple of pictures that I didn’t observe in the on-screen previews before I sent to print, and my workflow has not changed from the last book. Or maybe it’s also that the work on this book was a little rushed, and more thought should have gone into the selection and touch-up of the pictures.

The new book!

The new book!

Matching pictures from two books covering the birth of our two kids - 4 years apart.

Matching pictures from two books covering the birth of our two kids – 4 years apart.

Still, the effort was justified against the outcome. Hannah was thrilled with the book, and enjoyed going through each page of pictures of her growing years. Peter can’t quite enjoy the book yet – he’s more likely going to lick, or worse still, chew on the pages if he has his hands on it – but in a year’s time, he should be able to.:)

We benefited from a long holiday/weekend last week by taking advantage of a public holiday with an additional day of Leave added on to do things with Hannah and Peter. The highlight of the four-day break was to bring Hannah out – on Children’s Day – for a visit to the Singapore Science Center, followed by a ballet appreciation performance @ Esplanade with the Singapore Dance Theater. Going to the Science Center especially brought about a huge sense of déjà vu. It wasn’t so long – alright 35 years ago – when my parents brought us to the Singapore Science Center, and now we’re bringing our kids there too to, hopefully, inculcate in them an early appreciation for science.

Hannah’s reaction to the ballet performance was a lot more mixed though. She enjoyed the first couple of numbers, and possibly because there were too many numbers in the about 80 minute performance, she got distracted and started fidgeting mid way through. From a look around the the reasonably packed theater, lots of other kids too were also getting restless. Still, at least for the attending adults, I learned a thing or two about ballet – like what it means and takes to earn the title of ‘ballerina’, the trust they need to have with their (male) partners, and why their costumes are adorned in certain ways. Watching the performers and especially the two or three lead ballerinas, left me again with awe on the kind of physicality their art demands.

Pictures.:)

Hannah is getting better at the art of taking selfies. She still has yet to fully get a handle on the zoom lever though.

Hannah is getting better at the art of taking selfies. She still has yet to fully get a handle on the zoom lever though.

Interacting with the exhibits at the Science Center. Ling was able to explain the science behind the exhibits, while daddy was easily distracted by everything. "Oooooh - shiny!!"

Interacting with the exhibits at the Science Center. Ling was able to explain the science behind the exhibits, while daddy was easily distracted by everything. “Oooooh – shiny!!”

Family Selfie @ Esplanade!

Family Selfie @ Esplanade!

Several of our FB friends still remark how alike Hannah and occasionally even Peter looks like me. Still just can't see the immediate resemblance though!

Several of our FB friends still remark how alike Hannah and occasionally even Peter looks like me. Still just can’t see the immediate resemblance though!

Coffee Bean @ Suntec City. We haven't gone by the very large mall for ages, and were surprised at how different the place looks today after years of refurbishment.

Coffee Bean @ Suntec City. We haven’t gone by the very large mall for ages, and were surprised at how different the place looks today after years of refurbishment.

We've started dropping Peter into the child seat on the supermarket trolleys now that Hannah has all but outgrown it. He finds the experience novel.

We’ve started dropping Peter into the child seat on the supermarket trolleys now that Hannah has all but outgrown it. He finds the experience novel, even if his facial expression here doesn’t show that.

 

One of the main reasons why I started moving in 2010 to the micro four-thirds system was the general sizing of the camera bodies and lenses. Basically, the removal of the reflex mirror found in traditional (D)SLRs meant that camera bodies could be made smaller, and the smaller imaging sensor also meant that lenses didn’t need to be quite so big to cover a larger sensor. Things have changed quite a bit since then, since we now have full-frame mirrorless camera systems, and debate continues to rage among enthusiasts and loyalists of different camera systems on the merits and disadvantages of different systems. For the moment though, the truisms that still apply are, that generally micro four-third systems compared to full-frame systems…

Occupy less mass/weight

Lenses cost slightly less than the full-frame equivalents (thought not always)

Handle low light images less well

What has also changed is the emergence of larger sensor compact cameras too. The initial wave of models weren’t very good – they tended to be bulky, slow, and using batteries that didn’t give quite the same life as micro four-third systems. That has also been changing too, which brings me to this post: that I’ve been revisiting the most recent and upcoming range of large sensor compact cameras and exploring if this is the right time now to get one. I still have the almost two year old Panasonic LX7 which I bought for cheap during a crazy discounted offer on Amazon, and several of those wide-perspective shots of The Minton development in progress were taken on that little compact. But the camera has never been a low-light wonder. Heck; there’s a perceptible loss of detail even at the lower ISO settings already.

The bunch of models I’ve been keeping my eye on include:

Sony RX100 III

This compact features a 1″ sensor that reviewers have raved about, is in its third iteration already, and Sony managed to squeeze in a small viewfinder to it even. I’ve been playing with a demo set at the Sony showroom @ Nex. The compact feels solidly made, and the rear LCD screen is sharp, bright and colorful. The viewfinder though is a little clunky in actual operation (one has to first pop it up, then pull it towards oneself for it to work). The camera is available now but also dreadfully expensive at USD899. Ouch.

Canon G7 X

This yet-to-be released compact looks like Canon’s answer to Sony’s RX100 above. The upcoming compact uses a 1″ sensor, shoots as wide as the Sony but also offers a slightly further zoom at 100mm compared to Sony’s 70mm. Interesting. The CIPA rated battery life is worrying though at just 210 shots, compared to the 300+ shots that the Sony can muster. The expected retail price is substantially lower than Sony’s too at USD699.

Panasonic LX100

Of the bunch of large sensor compact cameras, this is the one I’m most interested in. Unlike the Canon and Sony models above, this fellow uses a nearly m4/3-sized sensor, a max aperture range of f1.7 to f2.8, built-in electronic viewfinder, and a reasonable battery life rated at 330 shots by CIPA at the moment. And as a bonus, it offers 4K video recording too. The general feeling among enthusiasts is that this is the one compact that could give the equivalent large aperture and pricey lenses in the m4/3s system a good run for the money, since the sensor is almost to m4/3s and max aperture is right there too at f1.7 to f2.8. Ticks all the boxes, excepting size – it’s larger than the above two models, which significantly reduces the space advantage in comparison to my E-PL6. This forthcoming compact is priced similarly to the Sony at USD899.

Panasonic GM5

This one isn’t a large sensor compact, but an interchangeable lens camera of the same breed as the line of m4/3 cameras from Olympus and Panasonic. I included this forthcoming model here only because it’s a baby-sized camera that allows you to leverage on the full range of m4/3 lenses. The second iteration of this camera also improves on a bunch of things off the first generation: including a viewfinder and a hot-shoe! Size-wise, it’s about the same as the already diminutive RX100, and is expected to be pegged at the same asking price as the LX100 – USD899.

All very tempting. Gonna be hard to decide which of these four if I eventually find myself deciding to pick up one of these at the end of this year!

 

 

I’ve been using m4/3 cameras for more than 4 years now, and was running through my records the various camera bodies of this system I’ve picked up over the period.

March 2010 – Olympus E-PL1

April 2011 – Olympus E-PL2

May 2012 – Olympus E-M5

October 2013 – Olympus E-PL6

The E-M5 has been my workhorse camera for almost 2.5 years now and while it’s starting to show its age through the usual nicks and bruises, still functions otherwise well. The E-M5 was joined by the E-PL6 a year ago, and both cameras have found permanent spots in my Messenger bag whenever we’re out of the home.

I was curious though to see how pictures on a camera with an APS-C sensor fares against these m4/3s. Nikon has been pumping out new models of its full-frame cameras, but disappointingly, seems to have become uncertain on what to do with their APS-C DSLRs. The D7000 – which I bought in January 2012 – hasn’t seen much use since I bought the E-M5. So, over the weekend, I dusted it off, brought out my two favorite primes for it – the 50mm and 35mm f1.8s – and took pictures at home of our kids.

Peter still as stony-faced as ever.

Peter still as stony-faced as ever.

Deep in contemplation o things important to 5 year olds.

Deep in contemplation of things important to 5 year olds.

She doesn't pose as willingly anymore though - so memorable shots are harder than ever to come by.

She doesn’t pose as willingly anymore though – so memorable shots are harder than ever to come by.

Probably not evident here, but I messed up the focusing point in this picture, so Peter's face is somewhat out of focus.

Probably not evident here, but I messed up the focusing point in this picture, so Peter’s face is somewhat out of focus.

Still extremely attached to Mommy.

Still extremely attached to Mommy.

With the 50mm, wide-open.

With the 50mm, wide-open.

The results were pretty mixed for sure. Running off my head:

I realized again how helpful the 5 axis built-in optical stabilization on the E-M5 is to picture taking. A small number of shots with the two Nikon primes – and these are both non-stabilized lenses – were out of focus to varying degrees because of camera shake.

The D7000’s ‘kaplak’ mirror slap each time I released the shutter was very loud compared to the E-M5’s very quiet shutter that I’d gotten so used to.

The D7000’s back panel buttons and command dials feel a lot more premium than the squishy and small buttons off the E-M5.

I like the colors coming off the E-M5 than the Nikon D7000’s – so much so that I found myself dialing up the image color saturation setting on the latter.

Bokeh off the two Nikon primes were marvelous, but the thinner depth of field caught me off guard. Made me realize again how forgiving are m4/3s when it comes to errors in focusing points.

The last observation was especially pertinent, since I sometimes wonder if I should give a (mirrorless?) full-frame system a go, and then become cognizant of that adage; that those systems can be extremely unforgiving, and your photographic techniques had better be pretty good already. There is a new but future camera purchase I’m thinking of though at year’s end – will blog about it soon enough.:)

 

 

Our extended family had a wedding over the weekend when a cousin had her traditional wedding ceremony. The cousin is actually from Hainan, but has been working in Singapore for almost a decade now, and has become close to our family – especially parents – over the years. I guess it’s also Mom’s connection back to her birth country from so many years ago. Our cousin is a sweet lass and she married a local Singaporen who works in the infocomm sector and who during the groom’s speech at the banquet wowed everyone with his mastery of Mandarin.

Hannah was fascinated with the entire occasion; right from when the groom came to the family home to ‘win’ the bride (the gate custodians – who would have guessed – were her cousins and her, none of whom were older than 10 years old – to seeing the new bride in her gown, and the 10 course dinner – “Wow daddy – there’s so much food!!”

Peter on the other hand has been a little more cranky than usual in the last week. In fact, he whines and goes into mini-bawls too easily, which Ling guesses is partially because of his inability to articulate his wants and desires to us. Totally unlike Hannah at the same age, who was often contend to wait for us. We’re really hoping that come December when we go on our vacation, Peter would be better able to communicate and hopefully be a little less impatient.

On the other hand, we’ve been trying whenever opportunity presents itself to let Peter exercise his little legs outside, under our and Hannah’s close watch though. It’s always fun to watch toddlers walk. They basically just baby-stomp around all over!

Peter stomping at Serangoon Nex. New-found freedom!

Peter stomping at Serangoon Nex. New-found freedom!

A minder on each hand. Won't be long before he discovers running - then we'll be in trouble.

A minder on each hand. Won’t be long before he discovers running – then we’ll be in trouble.

Peter at 1 year 2 months 2 weeks old.

Peter at 1 year 2 months 2 weeks old.

The kids wanted the groom to sing tracks from 'Frozen', but forgot about it the minute the groom fished out the ang pows.:)

The kids wanted the groom to sing tracks from ‘Frozen’, but forgot about it the minute the groom fished out the ang pows.:)

Dad with Peter. I haven't used the 45mm f1.8 lens a lot in the last few months, so the weekend wedding was one opportunity to get some shots in.

Dad with Peter. I haven’t used the 45mm f1.8 lens a lot in the last few months, so the weekend wedding was one opportunity to get some shots in.

Hannah had lots of fun with her En, her cousin who's younger by just a year - but loads more confident and chatty!

Hannah had lots of fun with her En, her cousin who’s younger by just a year – but loads more confident and chatty!