We’ll be moving into our new Minton home this weekend, and that’s meant a lot of trips between our current and new homes transporting fragile equipment that we’re not trusting to the movers. These have included the many electronic appliances from the kitchen and kitchenware – and lots of other things that will not be easy fitting into the stack of rectangular boxes that we’ve been given – e.g. Hannah’s (many) toys. And anything else that can fit into the car each trip. Come to think of it – I don’t think our movers will have much to do during our Big Moving Day this weekend, besides carting along a few boxes of books, the fridge, the dryer, the TV, and a couple of other large pieces LOL.

Our new home has gone through several rounds of washing since the middle of last week too; including one general washing as included as part of our main renovation and another cleaning done by our own part-time helpers. As it turns out, these were both wasted as we discovered scratches on our parquet floors caused during the main renovation. That’s required urgent re-sanding/varnishing of our parquet floors one more time round just yesterday, and the dust and particles generated have coated the bedrooms and to a lesser degree the other parts of our apartment with a dirt layer. So, the general cleaners came in again this afternoon to do another round of washing, and our own cleaners will be returning also for another round. With hindsight, we should have expected that some damage to our wooden flooring would have occurred and required our designer to explicitly forecast it into his project schedule. Oh well – lesson learned, and ultimately a price to pay for a tight timeline for us to move-in.

The apartment does look quite nicely done up at this point, and the look and feel of our new home has changed significantly since the curtains and blinds went in this afternoon. To be fair, we didn’t look too far and wide for curtain contractors (we checked out perhaps just about 4 such contractors), before deciding on a Johore Bahru-based curtain specialist who’s also incidentally doing a number of other units at The Minton. Ling was in charge of choosing the types of curtains and blinds and the materials for each to her, but we did have a couple of commonly-agreed considerations guiding the decisions:

Our parents once remarked that curtains project a sense of ‘homeliness’ (whatever that means!) that is less evident in blinds. Might be traditional thinking at play.

We were watchful of shrinkage in curtains. Our Ikea curtains in our first/current home shrunk significantly over the years.

We were mindful of maintenance, taking into account that we’re staying in a relatively dusty environment.

Pictures of the three men who came by to work on the curtains:

Marking out drilling holes to mount the blinds frames in the children's room.

Marking out drilling holes to mount the blinds frames in the children’s room.

Lots of blinds everywhere!

Lots of blinds everywhere!

Timber blinds for the Master bedroom.

Timber blinds for the Master bedroom.

Day and night curtains for the living hall.

Day and night curtains for the living hall.

We also made sure that our designer was looped in our discussions with the curtain specialist before main renovation began, since we did want colors and materials to mutually complement. Here’s the outcome of each room and its covers. As it turned out, our curtains specialist might have made a mistake in one of the materials used.

Zebra blinds for the Children's room.

Zebra blinds for the Children’s room.

Zebra blinds in our workroom.

Zebra blinds in our workroom.

50mm timber blinds with decorative tape in the Master Bedroom.

50mm timber blinds with decorative tape in the Master Bedroom.

Simple roller blinds for our Master bedroom toilet.

Simple roller blinds for our Master bedroom toilet.

'Marisa 1' day and night curtains. Ling said this was the original choice months ago, but was changed at a discussion with the curtains contractor at a later point. I think this color looks fine though (but the wife disagrees violently!).

‘Marisa 1′ day and night curtains. Ling said this was the original choice months ago, but was changed at a discussion with the curtains contractor at a later point. I think this color looks fine though but the wife disagrees violently! :)

As it turned out, the job was not completed. We’d discovered that the roller blinds in the short side of the yard balcony would mean that the grill windows – that swing in – can no longer be opened. We’re laying this on the invisible grills fellow, as we did tell him that there’d be roller blinds at that spot. In any case, the grills contractor will be coming by soon to reverse the swing direction of those windows, and the roller blinds at the yard can go in thereafter.

Our main renovation project at the Minton has concluded, with just a few more items to touch-up and fix. At this point, I thought it’d be useful for me to share about timelines, the different phases of our home renovation, task dependencies and the like. This might not be indicative of renovation projects in general, but it’s from our Minton project point of view and our working with our designer. Firstly, the key dates are:

Renovation start date: 28 Feb 2014

Main Renovation end date: 10 April 2014

Total calendar days: 42 days (30 days if deducting Saturdays and Sundays) / 6 weeks

I’ve excluded touch-up work and minor fixes from this period, as we’re likely gonna find additional numerous things as time passes. Most IDs we spoke to in our preliminary discussion and exploration phase last year suggested that our scope of work would require between 4-6 weeks of work, so that our own eventual home project took 6 weeks is within the suggested period. Interestingly, when we first met and spoke to our appointed designer last September, he’d confidently said that our project would take 4 weeks, and it was only later in January this year upon further discussions and planning when that period was extended to 6 weeks. And even with that, things got just a mite rushed towards the end.

We didn’t eventually take on all our items in our intended renovation, but based on what I’ve learned, here’s my list of how long each activity would take and its dependencies.

timelines

Keep in mind too that several activities can run concurrently; e.g. ceiling work could run simultaneously alongside tiling work. The time taken for each activity will also depend on the scope of work involved; e.g. a project involving less carpentry than ours will almost certainly wrap sooner too.

Edits:

1. Invisible grills should ideally be done after (not before) the washing if it involves chemicals.

Day 40 of our renovation @ Minton, and more finishing touches to various things in our home. We are appreciative of our designer who has been quite amendable to our requests for numerous little additional features and complements to our home.

For instance, take a look at the legs of the living room sofa we bought from Taylor B:

Dark brown legs!

Dark brown legs!

But our complementing 1.5 seater sofa from Ikea on the other hand looks like this:

Light brown legs!

Light brown legs!

Trust the wife again with her eagle-like eyes to immediately notice that the colors don’t match! So we asked our designer if his carpenter could help us lacquer these four legs to a dark brown shade – and he readily helped us out! Here’s what it looks like now:

It's not in men's nature to notice these things - really.

It’s not in men’s nature to notice these things – really.

And more pictures of small item work that was done today:

We were thrilled that our designer was able to fabricate wall-hung shelves similar to designs that Ling had found earlier. These won't be books though but little decorative items in the children's room.

We were thrilled that our designer was able to fabricate wall-hung shelves similar to designs that Ling had found earlier. These might not be books though but little decorative items hung on this shelf in the children’s room.

The enclosed shelving in the large cabinets in our +1/study room could use support beams to prevent the shelf planks from sagging - so we asked for them and our designer also obliged.

The enclosed shelving in the large cabinets in our +1/study room could use support beams to prevent the shelf planks from sagging – so we asked for them and our designer also obliged. We’ve also asked for similar support beams for the wall hung cabinets in the workroom too.

This was a very pleasant surprise. More often than not, custom-built bed frame mattress bases are just left as unlaminated white - but our designer used the same high quality laminates for the bedframe for the mattress base too. Not quite necessary since once the mattress is put on top it, you'd never see that base again - but we really appreciate the thoughtfulness.

This was a very pleasant surprise. More often than not, custom-built bed frame mattress bases are just left as unlaminated white – but our designer used the same high quality laminates he used for the bedframe for the mattress base too. Not quite necessary since once the mattress is put on top it, you’d never see that base again – but we really appreciate the thoughtfulness.

The dishwasher cabinet. Pretty simple design and to house the Bosch half-height dishwasher we just placed an order for over the weekend. The water inlet and drainage outlet were originally part of the kitchen layout, but we drew an additional power point on the side of the cabinet for the appliance.

The dishwasher cabinet. Pretty simple design and to house the Bosch half-height dishwasher we just placed an order for over the weekend. The water inlet and drainage outlet were originally part of the kitchen layout, but we drew an additional power point on the side of the cabinet for the appliance.

The quartz surface on top of the dishwasher cabinet. We noted a month ago that our designer suggested not choosing an exact match for this surface against the rest of the kitchen countertop, since there will be a height difference between this cabinet and the existing countertop.

The quartz surface on top of the dishwasher cabinet. We noted a month ago that our designer suggested not choosing an exact match for this surface against the rest of the kitchen countertop, since there will be a height difference between this cabinet and the existing countertop.

The last painting work should begin in the next few days, so another post to come soon.:)

We received our project handover date for our Minton apartment last week – which meant that the numerous other activities that had been kept in view could move quickly too. These included picking up several more small items and fixtures for various parts of the house – these will be installed by our designer’s workers in a single swoop – scheduling our own cleaners to clean up the place before moving in, appointing our clothesline system contractor to fix up two pulley-based systems in the yard, and making orders for large household appliances and fixing up a delivery date for them. And our boxes for our moving arrived midweek too – all 90 of them – and packing and disposing all our current furniture and items in our current home has take up pretty much all our free time in the last few days.

The large household appliances – TV, laundry machine, washer, refrigerator etc. – at our current home were mostly purchased 8 years ago at a electrical appliance store situated in the heartland. The notion then was that these stores offer appliances at price-points that were routinely cheaper than normal stores. Interestingly, this time round, we found pretty good deals for appliances at Parisilk, an appliance store with several outlets in heartland areas, and settled on a Sony KDL50W704A 50″ LED Smart TV, the Bosch half-height dishwasher that we’d constructed a kitchen cabinet for, and an Electrolux EWF10932 9kg washer that we’re hoping very hard will be able to fit past the yard toilet door frame. The rest of the household appliances – the 8 year old fridge and similarly-aged dryer, and a 2 year old 46″ Panasonic Plasma TV – will be following us to the new home.

The carpenter was also finishing up his carpentry work today on Day 39 after taking a break over the weekend. We met him with our designer late this evening to go through some final details before he wraps work the next day (or so). Our assigned carpenter is a one man (and his wife) team and his workshop isn’t far from The Minton, and all the furniture in our home was handmade by him. While inspecting the various furniture items we’ve got in our home just now, he shared a story: that the children’s bedframe was super complex for him to fabricate and he thought very hard how to implement our designer’s plans, and he was very proud of how he fabricated it. But when his wife saw what he did for this children’s bedframe the other week, she asked him “How come you do this owner’s house so nice, but you do our own house like sh*t?!”

Too funny for words.:)

Just a couple of pictures this time.

Our glass writing board. Our designer found a contact point to do a small one for us. This will be our space for us to scribble "Menu for the day", and "Household Chores Roster".:)

Our glass writing board. Our designer found a contact point to do a small one for us. This will be our space for us to scribble “Menu for the day”, and “Household Chores Roster”.:)

Our conversion of the Dry Kitchen open shelves into enclosed ones like these. Learned from our neighbor's design!

Our conversion of the Dry Kitchen open shelves into enclosed ones like these. Learned from our neighbor’s design!

We were quire surprised to see this. Our designer got the carpenter to laminate the insides of the TV console in our Master bedroom too. Normally, the internals are left unlaminated.

We were quire surprised to see this. Our designer got the carpenter to laminate the insides of the TV console in our Master bedroom too. Normally, the internals are left unlaminated.

 

Day 6 of carpentry installation and Day 35. We were just hearing from another neighbor staying in a block beside us who’s renovation project is now into its 11th week already, with long lull periods where nothing has been happening. From what I understand, his unit’s project scope is just slightly larger than ours, but if I were in shoes, I’d be a little disconcerted that the renovation is taking so long to complete. On our own project; we saw that both the electrician and carpenter had been working to fix up the remaining light fixtures, and also fix the issues we mentioned in yesterday’s blog entry.

Pictures as always.

Our two ÅRSTID wall-lights from Ikea have been installed into the headboard in our bedframe. The warm light from these two lamps work well against the wood textured laminate we chose for the headboard.

Our two ÅRSTID wall-lights from Ikea have been installed into the headboard in our bedframe. The warm light from these two lamps work well against the wood textured laminate we chose for the headboard.

Four drawers built into the bedframe base.

Four drawers built into the bedframe base.

The right LED downlight above our Living Hall's feature wall has been relocated by a few inches too, resolving an issue mentioned from yesterday.

The right LED downlight above our Living Hall’s feature wall has been relocated by a few inches too, resolving an issue mentioned from yesterday.

The fan in our +1/study is pretty noisy. A closer inspection revealed that the fan had not been installed entirely level against the ceiling, and in fact was inclined by a few degrees - possibly enough just to cause the fan's motor to wobble at high-speeds. Our designer will be getting the electrician to look into this again.

The fan in our +1/study is pretty noisy. A closer inspection revealed that the fan had not been installed entirely level against the ceiling, and in fact is inclined by a few degrees – possibly enough just to cause the fan’s motor to wobble at high-speeds. Our designer will be getting the electrician to look into this again.

We blogged that we'd be converting the dry kitchen counter top into additional shelving; work on this item - one of the last few items remaining - has started too.

We blogged that we’d be converting the dry kitchen counter top into additional shelving; work on this item – one of the last few items remaining – has started too.

Our designer informed us too of a tentative project conclusion and handover date too, and it’s in a week’s time. The carpentry should finish tomorrow, after which the first several days of next week will be touch-up work, followed by a final coat of painting on Wednesday, debris clearing on Thursday, and general cleaning and washing on Friday. Hooray!

Day 5 visit of carpentry work and Day 34 of our overall renovation project @ Minton. We were glad to see that several of the carpentry issues we identified in the last few days had been rectified or in the midst of it. On the other hand, we spotted two more – one of which was our oversight but thankfully just a very minor thing, but the other was something our designer had missed out on, but he recognized and immediately said he’d rectify it. This again perhaps underscores the point I observed in my last post; how important it is to be all hands on deck to observe and check as frequently as possible when carpentry installation begins.

Just a couple of pictures this time.

Rectified! Seems that our carpenter dismantled the wall-hung cabinet and shelf, swapped them around, the re-mounted them back.

Rectified! Seems that our carpenter dismantled the wall-hung cabinet and shelf, swapped them around, then re-mounted them back.

blog-2014-minton-P1040752-renovation-day34

The base of our master bedroom frame has been installed, alongside the four drawers (they’re still missing the laminate surfaces though).

New issue we discovered today. This is the TV feature wall in our Master Bedroom, and we needed 20cm depth for both our TV and mounting bracket.  A small part of it is our fault too as we'd sent so many emails on measurements over the last 2 months that it's easy for someone to get confused. Still, our designer recognized it as his bad, and said he'd re-do the backing for us.

New issue we discovered today. This is the TV feature wall in our Master Bedroom, and we needed 20cm depth for both our TV and mounting bracket. A small part of it is our fault too as we’d sent so many emails on measurements over the last 2 months that it’s easy for someone to get confused. Still, our designer recognized it as his bad, and said he’d re-do the backing for us and give us sufficient depth to ensure the TV does not protrude out later.

Yep, it's big enough to put a 100" LED TV, but no I got no money for one! Hannah asked why was our Living Hall TV feature wall so large, and proceeded to make a face while posing for a picture.:)

Yep, it’s big enough to put a 100″ LED TV, but no I got no money for one! Hannah asked why was our Living Hall TV feature wall so large, and proceeded to make a face while posing for a picture.:)

This was from yesterday; that the two structural components in our shoe cabinet weren't elevated equally - we were thrilled to see that they are now.

This was from yesterday; that the two structural components in our shoe cabinet weren’t elevated equally – we were thrilled to see that they are now.

Our dishwasher cabinet in progress. The height for the dishwasher shelf is 46cm, just enough for our 45cm dishwasher itself. Wished we'd asked for just a bit more clearance, but that's our bad. The glass board you see there is for our dry kitchen - our writing board for all manner of stuff.:)

Our dishwasher cabinet in progress. The height for the dishwasher shelf is 46cm, just enough for our 45cm dishwasher itself. Wished we’d asked for just a bit more clearance, but that’s our bad. The glass board you see there is for our dry kitchen – our writing board for all manner of stuff.:)

Additional shelving in the kitchen for Ling, but she realized that she shouldn't have asked for this since she just recently bought a dish drainer she wanted installed there.

Additional shelving in the kitchen for Ling, but she realized that she shouldn’t have asked for this since she just recently bought a dish drainer she wanted installed there.

Looks quite on schedule. Another update to come tomorrow.:)

Looking at the carpentry work done so far at our Minton home, we now really understand why so many homeowners complain about carpentry in their own home renovation projects. If anything can go potentially go wrong in renovation, it’s here. We never had to deal with such degrees of woodwork in our current home. Every piece of furniture at our Rivervale home was bought off-the-shelf. So, it’s an interesting experiment for us for sure. I guess if we had a bigger home, we wouldn’t need to do so much customization. Guess carpentry is almost a necessity to provide a functional home that’s still minimally pleasing to look at visually.

Given how important this renovation aspect is, we’ve been making time every day this week to by to check on things. Which we did again in the late afternoon today – Day 4 of our carpentry installation. On the plus side, the woodwork is coming along very quickly. If nothing else, the carpenter assigned to us is very fast for what we’re guessing is still a one-man-show. But we noticed a few more issues – but fortunately, our designer was in the compound, and as he knew we were checking on the state of progress, came up to observe with us.

Our partially completed TV Feature Wall in the Living Hall. It’s a pretty simplistic design, but offering pretty good storage options near the surface’s base.

Cables drawn out and to be connected into power sockets that will be built into the drawer end.

Lots and lots of light switches everywhere, with the Living Hall’s fan regulator too.

The study tables in the workroom. Following through with yesterday’s post, Ling has asked our designer to get the carpenter to rectify his goof, or maybe April Fool’s joke. Not sure how he’s gonna do that, but as our designer said, it was the carpenter’s mistake and it’s his job to fix it now.

The just-installed 48″ fan in our Master Bedroom, and it seems capable of generating very good air movement, though not quite to the extreme cyclone we’re getting with the 50″ fan in the children’s room!

Our King-sized bedframe as seen from the opposite angle. We’re quite pleased with this too so far.

Our massive wall shelves in the +1/study room. This one is coming along very nicely, though the Crestar fan was giving out a lot of noise when turned up to the highest speeds. Our designer will be getting his electrician to check on this, and hopefully it’s not because we’ve got a cranky fan. The wind circulation generated by this little 30″ fan is also somewhat weak, but guess it’s to do with how little space the fan has to move air around.

A closer look at the shelves. We asked for double plywood shelves here, which our designer provided as part of his design, on account that these are going to hold very heavy stacks and piles of thick books. We’ve had very bad experiences with Ikea shelves, so hope these custom-built ones will fare better.

We appreciated too that our designer got our carpenter to bring out the light switch and fan regulator and flush it against the cabinet shelf’s wall. Looks very neat!

These Ikea lamps worked very nicely too. They just barely clear my head when I stand underneath them, but it won’t be an issue since the two lamps will be directly on top of the dining table.

Now we had another issue with our nearly completed shoe cabinet. This isn’t evident from the picture, but the haversack pigeon holes and the main shoe cabinet aren’t really flushed with each other. There’s a small but still obvious 1 cm elevation difference between the two structural components. We’re not certain why the carpenter did not align the two components, but guess it might be because the haversack component was mounted first, and it was only then that the carpenter realized he should had provided a bit more clearance for the LED downlight just in front of it. In any case, Ling was not pleased with the misalignment, and asked our designer to get the carpenter to rectify it.

Not sure how the carpenter is going to re-align the two structural stacks (the main shoe shelfs, and the haversack shelf).

And one more issue. It’s also not evident from this picture, but now that the TV feature wall has been mounted, we realized that the two downlights on top of it aren’t equi-distance. I didn’t spot this in our afternoon’s check, but trust the wife with her eagle-eyes to notice it quickly! In the picture below, the left downlight is closer to the feature wall’s vertical edge than the right downlight. Our designer himself had to stare at it for a minute before he realized what Ling was pointing out. But yes, our designer will be getting his electrician to correct it too.

Drew guidelines in this picture to show what Ling saw.

Drew guidelines in this picture to show what Ling saw.

All these said; things are still about ballpark alright and progressing along at least with no holdups. We’ve heard a lot of horror stories of renovation project’s carpentry going haywire, so we’re thankful that at least the errors made so far are still minor (well, aside from the incorrect cabinet and wall-hung shelving placement in our workroom!), even if they’ll require some ingenuity to rectify. More updates to come soon.:)

Day 32 of our home renovation project @ Minton, and Day 3 of carpentry installation. We’ve been quite pleased with the internal structures of our various carpentry items in our home – though we also ran into our first hitch along the same today. More details on that later, but here are more pictures again.

Storage galore!

Hannah and Peter’s twin bedframe has four drawers. The ones at the lower-level bed are especially deep too.

Beginnings of our TV feature wall and console in our Living Hall. The feature wall will be suspended off the floor too; a design trait that Ling asked for to allow easier mopping.

asdasd

Four of the storage drawers in the king-sized bedframe revealed, and the other two drawers in the bedside tables.

asdasda

Our half-width TV feature wall in the Master Bedroom. The cavity will hold our existing 46″ Plasma TV. There’s a hidden console just underneath the cavity too with quite a bit of storage space too.

asdasda

The suspended full-height shoe cabinet. It’s too tall to fit to fit into a single picture frame! There are four haversack pigeon holes too.

Daylight White

We really liked our 3-in-1 LED downlights. Each of the light’s color temperatures really provide a very different look and feel to the room. Here are the downlights in our Master Bedroom in daylight white…

Cool white

… and In cool white, the color temperature we suspect will be the most heavily used…

Warm white

… and finally in warm white!

And below is where the carpenter goofed. Check our our intended design as planned for by our designer:

And what the carpenter has installed so far:

asdasd

It’s not the different laminate surfaces, since that was an intended choice on our part. But our carpenter had installed the wall-hung cabinet and shelving the wrong way round. It’s done correctly on the opposing side of the room, but I suspect the carpenter had thought we’d been asking for mirror images. Our designer quickly spotted the mistake when he did his rounds this morning, and alerted us immediately of it and assured us he’ll have the carpenter rectify it if we want. We’ll have to make a choice; go with this (I’m actually alright with the cabinets and shelves being mirror opposites, but Ling isn’t LOL), or get it corrected but that might potentially mean some delays to our carpentry installation completion.

Something to think about for sure very soon!

While both the front and back facades of our Minton apartment looks pretty cool, with its liberal use of glass, concrete and colors, practically, that even the toilets are featuring full glass windows have posed problems. Basically, as pretty as it looks from the outside, no one on the inside will want to have toilets and bathrooms whose interiors are laid bare! We knew early on we’d be covering the window panes, though how exactly to go about doing that we bounced between decisions till just a fortnight ago. We weren’t going with curtains – that much was certain. Between blinds and frosted film; blinds look a lot more elegant, but they won’t necessarily completely block out the window, and might leave visible gaps. Frosted film is another option – doesn’t look as good, but as a rule, the light transmission properties of various film grades do provide options to completely block out light from within.

We ended up deciding to do both frosted film and blinds, and engaged a curtain maker to do just that. The worker came by this morning to install frosted film for the window panes in our Master Bedroom and attached bathroom. With the benefit of hindsight now, it’s probably a good idea to have the film installed first before the grills – something we missed out on, but the worker didn’t seem too annoyed by that even, and gamely went about it. A couple hours later, it was all done. Our carpenters also came by to continue a bit of work too for Day 2 of carpentry installation.

Hannah got her first opportunity to inspect her new bed too.:)

The carpenter was just behind us, and looked anxious when Hannah went into her room to inspect the work done on her new bed. She did give her nod of approval - much to his relief!

The carpenter was just behind us, and looked anxious when Hannah went into her room to inspect the work done on her new bed. She did give her nod of approval – much to his relief!

The (almost) full height shoe cabinet hasn't been assembled yet, but some of its pieces are stacked at its eventual location, giving us an idea of what it'll look like later.

The (almost) full height shoe cabinet hasn’t been assembled yet, but some of its pieces are stacked at its eventual location, giving us an idea of what it’ll look like later.

Taking another close look at the wood texture of our Master Bedroom headboard.

Taking another close look at the wood texture of our Master Bedroom headboard.

Pretty deep wood grooves for a laminate surface!

Pretty deep wood grooves for a laminate surface!

We had frosted film done on the small section of our L-shaped window in the Master Bedroom.

We had frosted film done on the small section of our L-shaped window in the Master Bedroom.

The shower stall and basin in the Master Bathroom, with frosted film installed. Blinds will be installed in a fortnight.

The shower stall and basin in the Master Bathroom, with frosted film installed. Blinds will be installed in a fortnight.

The base frame of our workroom study tables. Each table will include four drawers.

The base frame of our workroom study tables. Each table will include four drawers.

Wall-hung cabinets in our workroom. They were a lot taller than we'd envisioned from the earlier 3D render.

Wall-hung cabinets in our workroom. They were a lot taller than we’d envisioned from the earlier 3D render.

Lots of wood pieces and materials in our Living Hall.

Lots of wood pieces and materials in our Living Hall.

As these home renovation projects go, one of the most risky items that can potentially pose problems with workmanship and material quality is in carpentry and woodwork, and Ling is pretty happy so far with the quality of work done on this part of our home renovation project. More notes to come soon.:)

Day 1 of carpentry installation. Exactly after four weeks since our renovation started, our carpentry items – cabinets, shelves, tables, bedframes, feature walls, side-tables plus an assortment of other items – are finally ready for installation. The week-long installation of these items started this morning, and given how important this phase of our renovation is – more than half of our renovation costs were in carpentry – both our designer and us were on site on the first day to supervise and observe the work done. The house is littered with wood pieces and laminate sheets ready for assembly. As it’s just the first day, it wasn’t easy to see where each piece was supposed to go to, but here’s what we can see at the moment.

These were placed in our yard balcony, and my guess, the four haversack/backpack pigeon holes we asked for as part of our shoe cabinet design.

These were placed in our yard balcony, and my guess, the four haversack/backpack pigeon holes we asked for as part of our shoe cabinet design.

Hannah and Peter's bedframe coming along very nicely! Ling really liked this, and it seems identical to the proposed design from a few months ago. I'd not noticed this from earlier, but the depth of the bedframe head has allowed for a cavity to built in for our children to place small toys and little accessories on the bedhead too.

Hannah and Peter’s bedframe coming along very nicely! Ling really liked this, and it seems identical to the proposed design from a few months ago. I’d not noticed this from earlier, but the depth of the bedframe head has allowed for a cavity to built in for our children to place small toys and little accessories on the bedhead too.

Our designer was able to fit another drawer into the stepped ledge as part of the children's bedframe design, so that was a very neat bonus too.

Our designer was able to fit another drawer into the stepped ledge as part of the children’s bedframe design, so that was a very neat bonus too.

The base of the King-sized bedframe in our Master Bedroom. I'd initially thought that the bedframe base would be a single piece, but it's apparently not, and it makes more sense, given the number of built-in storage drawers at its base.

The base of the King-sized bedframe in our Master Bedroom. I’d initially thought that the bedframe base would be a single piece, but it’s apparently not, and it makes more sense, given the number of built-in storage drawers at its base.

Several of the wood pieces had their laminate surfaces already glued in, like this one. Others not yet. My haphazard guess is that some of the wood pieces might had been too large for transportation and requiring onsite assembly - and thus necessitating the seamless laminate surfaces to be pasted only after assembly.

Several of the wood pieces had their laminate surfaces already glued in, like this one. Others not yet. My haphazard guess is that some of the wood pieces might had been too large for transportation and requiring onsite assembly – and thus necessitating the seamless laminate surfaces to be pasted only after assembly.

This is a close-up picture of the veneer laminate for our king-size bedframe. This solution as described in our earlier post was quite a bit more costly than the normal laminate surfaces, and Ling accompanied our designer to the factor in fact to select the laminate surface. We were very surprised to see how thick the laminate was indeed. The texture on the surface was also quite deep, providing for a an almost wood-like feel of the surface.

This is a close-up picture of the veneer laminate for our king-size bedframe. This solution as described in our earlier post was quite a bit more costly than the normal laminate surfaces, and Ling accompanied our designer to the factor in fact to select the laminate surface. We were very surprised to see how thick the laminate was indeed. The texture on the surface was also quite deep, providing for a an almost wood-like feel of the surface.

Our designer was very proud of his work on our Master Bedroom bedframe.:)

Our designer was very proud of his work on our Master Bedroom bedframe.:)

A huge role of laminate sheet still tied up in the living hall.

A huge role of laminate sheet still tied up in the living hall.

More pictures to show in the coming days as the woodwork gets installed.:)